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. there are many, many unanswered questions tonight, including unconfirmed reports on devices found. law enforcement officials have not confirmed that there were other unsploided bombs. the official confirmation is that there were two devices. to the extent that there were other devices today, isolated and treated in some way by law enforcement, those may have been devices that were investigated as suspect packages and done away with by law enforce. . no arrests have been made. the investigation is now being headed by the fbi in conjunction with other federal and state and local agencies. i want to bring in a young man who is an eyewitness. he was eating with co-workers when he heard the first explosion. so you're about 100 yards away. what did you hear? >> bewere inside the restaurant. heard the first explosion. kind of shook the building a little bit. we kind of wondered what it was. looked outside and saw some smoke. actually ran outside. then the second one blew up about 100 yards from us. >> did they sound like they were about the same size? >> the first one sounded small, because i
explosive devices. found on or near the scene of the bombings today. law enforcement officials have not confirmed that there were other unexploded bombs for lack of a less specific but more politic term. as of tonight the official confirmation is that there were two devices. only two. those were the two that caused the massive explosions. to the extent that there were other devices today, isolated and treated in some way by law enforcement, those may have been devices that were investigated as suspect packages, as potential bombs and done away with by law enforcement in the sometimes explosive way they do that. there are no suspects as of this evening. no arrests have been made. the investigation is now being headed by the fbi in conjunction with other federal and state and local agencies. i want to bring in now a young man today who is an eyewitness to what happened today. jared walker. he was eating with co-workers from ibm at a restaurant a football field's length of way when he heard the first explosion. thanks for being here. you're 100 yards away. what was it like watching? >>
to be watching these guys. maybe we need to change the laws so we can watch them. on the other side lawmakers say this is a free country. you can't just watch somebody because they are strong believers. how deep is the divide? >> we are going to see weeks and months of debate about this. same kind of othing we saw after the failed underwear bombing plot and the times square bombing plot, questions about holding the suspects as enemy combattants. if there is any evidence that the fbi or intelligence services made a mistake expect republicans to seize on that and use it as an opportunity to accuse the president of being too politicly correct in challenging what they think is a war against radical islam. >> i want to bring in a republican from pennsylvania and a member of the homeland security committee. good morning. >> nice to be with you. >> as you go into the briefing what are your concerns and questions in. >> we want to try to know what happened as every other american does with a little more detail. i think you identified the questions that are out there. from the front end, what is it that i
on boston bombing coming up this hour. when we return we're going to get into the law of this case. dzhokhar tsarnaev was formally charged today. he'll be prosecuted through the criminal justice system despite republicans who say he should be treated as an enemy combatant. >>> later, the russian connection. we have new details about the older brother, tamerlan, and his six-month trip overseas to russia, that area, as he became increasingly more devout in his religion and radicalism. >>> here in washington, the marathon bombings have already started to change the debate on things like -- you knew this was coming -- immigration. >>> finally, life started to return to normal this weekend in boston. i was up there as the slow healing begins. this is "hardball." as we say up there, "hardball." the place for politics. >>> he will not be treated as an enemy combatant. we will prosecute this terrorist through our civilian system of justice. >> welcome back to "hardball." that was of course, white house spokesman jay carney short by before 1:00 p.m. today making clear the boston suspect will not be t
to the bombing in boston. meanwhile, law enforcement officials in massachusetts are combing through more than 2,000 tips, looking through photos like this one, shall shows a bag sitting by a mailbox before the explosion. it is unclear at this point whether or not the bag has any relevance, but appears to be near the center of the explosion. president obama will be in boston tomorrow to attend a memorial service for the victims. for the loved once of those killed and maimed in the explosion, there is only confusion and many unanswered questions. joining me today here in new york city, nbc news capitol hill correspondent luke russert, and misterrorism expert michael leiter, and bob herbert, a distinguished senior fellow at dimos. >>> let's go to kristin welker for more. >> reporter: alex, good afternoon. here's what we know at this hour. this letter was received yesterday at an off-site mail facility. i want to emphasize that. it did not get close to the white house. it's typical for letters sent to this facility to undergo a screening. during that process, it was discovered that a letter address
. but as the colonel said, because of that extraordinary collaboration and cooperation by all of these law enforcement resources and assets and more to the point people, professionals, who brought their "a" game, we have a suspect in custody tonight. >> the community stood strong. it was a call from a resident in watertown. we asked you to remain vigilant, and you did. we got that call and we got the guy. and so we can't thank you enough. you've done everything and more than we've asked. extremely proud of law enforcement today and what we've accomplished. >> this whole ordeal started monday with the bombing attack at the finish line of the boston marathon. three people were killed, more than 170 injured. the suspect's older brother died early friday morning following a shootout with police. the two men are also suspected of killing an m.i.t. police officer, 26-year-old sean collier, who was sitting in his patrol car. now, police hope that the surviving suspect will be able to give them some critical information about a possible motive and whether any more people were involved. nbc's katy tur has been
the dead and possibly one law enforcement officer is missing. and our affiliate in houston kprc is reporting that the mobile morgue has been dispatched to west. that's an indication they intend find more bodies in the rubble. >> i know this is being treated as a crime scene. is that just out of an assumption of taking precaution here that it could be or do they know something? >> reporter: it's the world we live in, chuck. they are going to try to rule out the crime right away and focus on what they really believe it is and that's an industrial accident. and it's an industrial accident that sadly has been a part of texas history. back in 1947, in texas city, texas, two ships loaded with ammonia nitrate, same product here exploded killing thousands of people. it's the worst industrial accident in all of the united states. >> what about the first responders in west, texas? did they have the ability to deal with a disaster like this? experience and training? there have been some questions about that this morning. >> reporter: they have what they call mutual aid here. when the fire
penalty, is that what you're saying? >> reporter: sure. because then he's got cooperating with law enforcement, but he's also lost his leverage by saying this. it is in his interest to be able to tell them something. >> you think a lawyer, michael, would have told him to hold out until he got a deal? >> reporter: absolutely. absolutely. the one thing a lawyer is going to try to do at this point is to save his life. the one way to do that is show cooperation by pointing the finger at somebody else or helping them find somebody else. look, i don't take these statements at face value, just, you know, just to be clear. you know, he could well be protecting somebody. clearly there were others who they were talking to. it's hard to imagine the two of them just simply became radicalized by themselves without any encouragement from anybody else. >> that surprises me, too. >> reporter: seems there was an accomplice in the plot. and also, we have the statements from the uncle who says there was somebody who radicalized the older brother. >> so let me thank you very much. >> reporter: that's
the decision and, of course, i'm not second-guessing anybody. i did talk to a law enforcement officer over the weekend who, first of all, said, you know, it would have been much better for us all if this had been plotted out of a cave in afghanistan instead of, you know, an apartment in cambridge. >> one among us. >> yeah, one among us. but also he was saying not so sure about them shutting down the entire city and the message that that sends. you talk about copycats. the copycat said if i do something particularly heinous, i can hold an entire city hostage. >> one of the purposes of terrorists is to disrupt and forcing a city shut down and the rest, she used that end in addition to killing and injurying that you do. one of the reasons -- i don't want to second-guess the tactical decision to lock down boston. but i don't think this is something that if you will a scaleable or sustainable. >> no, we can't do this. >> imagine these guys hadn't been captured and all that. >> after what happened to the boston marathon in an internationally visible way. we were covering this all morning long. i
a portion of military law. it's not enough, but it's a good start. >> congresswoman, are you finding that the pentagon under chuck hagel, i know he hasn't been in office very long, he had a rocky confirmation process, do you have their attention? and are they responsive to your requests? >> they absolutely are. i don't think it could have gone anywhere near far enough. they say we have a zero tolerance policy and there's nothing like a zero tolerance policy going on out there. about you have increasing members of congress who are actively engaged in this conversation. recently a group of us were over at the pentagon meeting with the vice chiefs of staff at all levels, they are saying we're trying to change the culture. we're trying to change the training, we're trying to change our ability to talk about this. and part of what they need to do is change the number of prosecutions and laws. as anu said and you've heard, the military code of justice does not exactly follow civilian law. and there are reasons it's different. but civilian law was updated a long time ago with respect to how
purchases. they build products that look like and act like bombs and trigger switches so that law enforcement and the military can train on how to recognize them and detect them and avoid tripping them. to learn how to disarm them. this company sells not to the general public, but to agencies, specifically sell, dummy pressure cooker i.e.d.s to train on because there are so many of them around, it's the kind of thing around that people who work in explosives need to know how to do. people put explosives in pressure cookers and blow them up not using a fuse an a timer, but a gun shot. you can see it on youtube. pressure cooker bombs are the kind of thing that have been around for a long time that people believe they can make relatively easy. three summers ago, you might remember our coverage of al-qaeda releasing a magazine that tried to inspire home grown terror attacks around the world. their first issue included an article called how to make a bomb in the kitchen of your mom, which was hilarious on one hand, on the other, it gave specific instructions on how to make bombs. what
tobacco from 18 to 21. the new law would not prohibit people under 21 from possessing or smoking cigarettes. if passed, the measure would be the strictest limit on tobacco of any u.s. city. awesome. >> you kind of wonder when the mayor is going to pass a law that is going to require each new yorker to read at least 30 minutes of poetry. >> no. this is good. >> that one i would not expect to happen. >> this is what we need. we actually don't even need anybody buying or smoking cigarettes and getting sick from it and getting other people sick too. >> mika, can i point something out? >> sure. >> the matrix awards yesterday. women in communications. mike barnicle's wife introduced by mika brzezinski. >> oh, look at her. mika did a great job. and you know, ann did pretty damn well herself. >> ann was amazing. there's martha stewart. there were impressive women there. but i had the great honor of -- this is funny. i had the great honor of introducing ann. and they asked at one point for last year's matrix winners to stand up and barnicle stood up. >> i was wondering when mike barnicle
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)